10 unexpected stories you might have missed this week

10 unexpected stories you might have missed this week

The next week is inscribed in the book of history, and this means that it is time to take another look at those unusual moments that were included in the news bulletins.
The week has become intense for space lovers. First, there was talk about exoles and new dwarf planets. In addition, we learned about the Death Comet and how to buy Martian soil. We also have two interesting stories about people who themselves did not know that they were owners of large fortunes. And, since the matter touched finances, think of the most expensive whiskey in the world and about Robin Hood from the bank.
10. How to buy Martian soil?


If you ever wanted to buy Martian soil, the University of Central Florida (UCF) sells an exact copy of it at a price of $ 20 per kilogram, plus shipping.
A team of astrophysicists UCF has developed a standardized method for creating a simulator of Martian soil.This is vital for the study of Martian conditions, especially in terms of growing food on Martian soil.
By mixing, you can create a copy of the soil of various space objects, such as planets, satellites or asteroids - provided you have the correct recipe. At the moment, the team is working on an exact simulator of the lunar soil.
This technique was covered in an article published in the journal Icarus. Therefore, people who have read this article, if they wish, could use this knowledge to create their own Martian soil right at home, but still it would be better to order it in UCF. The team says that they already have 30 preliminary applications, including half a ton of soil for the Kennedy Space Center.
9. Revising Maya History

Back in February, scientists from the University of Tulena used LIDAR technology (from the English LIDAR: Light Identification Detection and Ranging - “detection, identification and determination of the distance using light”) to study the dense jungles of Northern Guatemala. They announced the discovery of thousands of ancient Mayan structures in dozens of previously unknown cities.Now the researchers have completed a detailed report on their findings and published it in the journal Science.
Scientists have discovered 61480 structures on an area of ​​2100 square kilometers and put them on maps. 362 square kilometers cover terraces and agricultural land with signs of amelioration, 952 square kilometers are occupied by ordinary agricultural land and 106 square kilometers are occupied by dams connecting urban centers with each other and with protected fields.
In the past, it was assumed that the Mayan civilization in Northern Guatemala consisted mainly of small city-states that were loosely connected with each other. The latest data requires a complete revision of this version. It seems that a developed community, consisting of large cities, whose population during the late classical period of the Maya (from 650 to 800 AD) ranged from 7 to 11 million people, lived in this area.
8. FBI Agent and Doom House

An FBI agent was injured after stepping on a private house in Oregon.
On September 7, in the small town of Williams, several law enforcement officers were summoned to the house of 66-year-old Gregory Rodvelt.They were summoned at the request of a real estate attorney who was commissioned to sell the estate after it was seized from Rodwellt.
It turned out that before leaving his former home, Rodwelt left several traps in it. He was charged with assaulting and injuring an agent, and court documents described the event as a scene from the movie "In Search of the Lost Ark." Perhaps the coolest surprise was the round jacuzzi, which was tilted in such a way that it was used to boil water on each person who came on the stretch. Besides him, inside the house there were strips with spikes and that same wheelchair that caused the injured FBI agent.
The trap included a wheelchair and fishing line tied to a detonator filled with ammunition and shot. X-ray found the fraction in the leg of the officer.
Although Rodvelt has been in an Arizona prison since April 2017, he was released for several weeks in August of this year to prepare for the confiscation of property. Presumably, it was at this time that he placed the stretch marks.
7. Record price for alcohol

A bottle of Macallan Scotch set a new price record for liquor.It became the most expensive whiskey in the world after it was auctioned off for 848,000 pounds.
This was a bottle of “Macallan Valerio Adami 1926” from an extremely rare batch consisting of just 12 bottles. The sale took place at the Bonhams auction in Edinburgh, but the identity of the buyer was not revealed.
Whiskey was distilled in 1926. Then for 60 years the drink was kept in a barrel and only then poured. Then Macallan invited famous artists Valerio Adami and Peter Blake to create labels, and each of them designed for 12 bottles.
The previous price record for whiskey was set earlier this year at another Bonhams auction in Hong Kong, and it was also a bottle of Macallan Valerio Adami 1926. At the moment we do not know how many more bottles are left from this batch. It is known that one bottle was opened and drunk, and another one was broken during an earthquake in Japan seven years ago.
6. The mathematical mystery has generated a lot of controversy.

For about ten days now, the mathematical world has been shocked by the fact that one of the greatest mysteries of mathematics has been solved. The winner of the Abel and Fields awards, Sir Michael Athia, claims to have found a solution to the Riemann hypothesis.
First proposed by the German mathematician Bernhard Riemann in 1859, his hypothesis of the same name states that “all non-trivial zeros of the zeta function lie on the vertical line Re = 0.5 of the complex plane”. Speaking in simple language, the hypothesis describes how primes are distributed among natural numbers.
Most mathematicians believe that the hypothesis is true. Until now, whatever calculations were made using this hypothesis, there were no data contradicting it. However, the main task - to find its mathematical proof - has not yet been solved.
So did Atya solve this mathematical riddle, which is 159 years old? It's too early to talk about it. September 25, he offered his version during a lecture in Germany. When he has a ready solution, he will report it to the mathematical community of the world. The actual verification of his evidence can take months and even years. Many mathematicians are skeptical.
If Attiya’s approach is correct, the scientist will receive not only a reason for pride, but also one million dollars, which he promised to pay to the Clay Institute for solving one of the seven great mathematical puzzles of the millennium.
five.The party about the sex of the future child ended in disaster

April 23, 2017 was supposed to be one of the happiest days in the life of Dennis Dickey. A 37-year-old border patrolman from Tucson, Arizona, organized a party about being told the floor of the unborn child. However, it ended in a massive fire that spread to tens of thousands of acres of land, causing millions of dollars in damage.
As parties on this occasion become more and more popular, future parents invent all new entertainments so that everyone will remember this day. Dickie was no exception.
The border agent decided to take advantage of the Tannerit binary explosive targets. This company sells certain products designed specifically for such parties - targets explode in the cloud, throwing blue or pink dust. When Dicky shot at his target, she flushed.
To Dickie's honor, he immediately reported the incident to the authorities and confessed his act. Nevertheless, he had to meet hundreds of firefighters who extinguished a fire in an area of ​​19,000 hectares during the week.
Last Friday, Dickie pleaded guilty to breaking the rule of law. He was sentenced to five years conditionally and ordered to pay $ 8 million in compensation .. It remains to be seen whether this will sustain his pocket.
4. Took from the rich - gave to the poor

Another interesting incident occurred in Italy, where the banking “Robin Hood” received two years for theft of approximately one million euros and the transfer of this money to the poor. However, since this was his first crime and he did not take a single cent, the defendant was given the opportunity to make a deal and admit his guilt, which gave him the opportunity to avoid a real prison sentence.
This story began in 2009. Gilberto Bachier was a bank manager in the small town of Forni di Sopra. The financial crisis forced desperate people to seek loans, although many of them did not have the right to receive them. To help those in need, Bashiera took small amounts from the accounts of wealthy clients and put them into the accounts of the poor so that they could get a loan.
Of course, customers were grateful and promised to quickly return the money, but some of them did not. Seven years later, Basher’s employers discovered a discrepancy between the amounts in the accounts, and the banking “Robin Hood” was handed over to the authorities.By that time, about one million euros had been lost that were not returned by Basher’s customers.
The bank manager got off with a rather mild punishment, but still he lost both his job and his house. Looking back at the past, Bashyer says that he does not think that he would do it again, because the price he paid is too high.
3. Poor ice cream seller turned out to be a billionaire

Last month, Pakistani Muhammad Abdul Qadir was summoned to the Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) for questioning. The agency employees were curious to find out how the bank account of a poor ice cream merchant who received only 500 rupees a day and who lived in slums turned out to be over 2.3 billion rupees.
In 2014, Kadir opened an account with the State Bank of Pakistan. The account was closed in 2015, the entire amount was withdrawn - 2.3 billion Pakistani rupees, or about 18.6 million US dollars. The ice cream seller claims that he first found out about it in September, when FIA agents knocked on his door. Although the account was opened with a valid copy of Kadir's ID, he insists that he could not ask to open an account, since he cannot write.He also invited FIA agents to a “tour” of his home to show his poor lifestyle.
It seems that Kadir was a pawn in the mass money laundering, in which the former President of Pakistan Asif Ali Zardari could potentially be involved. The FIA ​​is investigating the history of creating at least 77 other similar bank accounts, through which hundreds of millions of dollars of dirty money have passed.
As for Kadir, his story became public knowledge, and this complicated life for Kadir. Neighbors scoff at the “beggar billionaire”, and rumors of his wealth can make him a target for kidnappers.
2. The world's most expensive door support

A Michigan farmer was shocked when he learned that for decades he had been using a meteorite worth $ 100,000 to support the door.
According to the unnamed owner, he became the owner of the space stone in 1988, when he bought a farm in Edmore. The previous owner, also unaware of the value of the stone, used it to keep the door open, and handed the stone along with the farm. Curiously, the original owner knew that it was a meteorite.The stone landed on his land as early as the 1930s, when he was young, and he dug it out of the crater.
The new owner sold the farm a few years later, but, unlike his predecessor, he took the meteorite with him. For 30 years he used the stone mainly as a support for the door and occasionally gave it to the school for display. He heard stories that people find and sell meteorites and live by it, and finally decided to find out how much his stone costs.
Mona Sirbescu, a specialist at the University of Geology in Michigan, was simply stunned when she saw a stone. Its weight is about 10 kilograms, and this is the sixth largest recorded find in the history of Michigan, its cost is up to 100,000 dollars. The meteorite consists of 88.5% iron and 11.5% nickel. At the moment, a worthy repository is being sought for Edmore's meteorite, perhaps it will be either the Smithsonian Museum or the Museum of Minerals of the State of Maine.
1. Return of the Death Comet

Asteroid 2015 TB145 is again approaching the Earth. It is better known under the name "Comet of Death" due to the fact that its shape is very similar to the human skull.
A skull-shaped asteroid was first discovered in 2015 by the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. He was found on October 30, that is, in time for Halloween. This year, the Death Comet will approach Earth at the closest distance on November 11th. But even then the asteroid will pass at a distance of 40 million kilometers from Earth. This is much further than three years ago, when it approached 482,000 kilometers.
Astronomers believe that the stone guest is a degenerate comet, which means that he repeatedly passed close to the Sun, and it burned out all volatile substances. According to astronomers, there is no chance that the Comet of Death will collide with our planet, although it is still classified as “potentially dangerous” because of its size and proximity to Earth. The stone has a diameter of just over 600 meters, so it can not be seen with the naked eye. The next convergence is expected only in 2088.
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