Cold War Spyware

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Cold War Spyware

Espionage has become an integral part of the Cold War. Both sides tried their best to get as much information about each other as they could. While Hollywood romanticized the concept of espionage, reality was different. It was a dangerous cat-and-mouse game that usually resulted in torture, imprisonment, or the death of a spy caught by enemies.
Cold War Spyware
During the Cold War, the spies had to prepare for the worst. Their ability to blend in with the environment was vital for survival. The USSR and the United States have spent a large amount of money on training, replenishing, supplying equipment and deploying spies around the world. This has led to many technological innovations, ranging from tiny spy cameras to the deadly murder weapon.

1.

Sedgley OSS .38 Glove Pistol
Cold War Spyware
This single-shot pistol was developed by Stanley M. Heath in Philadelphia and was used by the Naval Intelligence Agency during the Cold War.The weapon was securely attached to the top of a thick leather glove, and the spy tended to wear long sleeves to hide the gun from the enemy’s eye. The weapon was activated by squeezing the hand into a fist and striking the target. After contact, the bullet was released into the support.

If the spy was in a difficult situation, he could raise his hands behind his head, allegedly surrendering. Thus, the small gun on the glove was impossible to notice. When the enemy approached at a sufficiently close distance, the spy punched him in the head and instantly killed him.

2.

Bulgarian umbrella
Cold War Spyware
In this deadly umbrella, a pneumatic device is hidden, which shoots at the sacrifice with a small poisonous needle containing ricin. On September 7, 1978, a Bulgarian journalist named Georgy Markov pricked his leg with the tip of such an umbrella. He died four days later in a hospital bed. The investigation began more than 35 years ago, which is the maximum period. There have never been any arrests, charges or detentions.

3.

CIA Anal Tool Kit
Cold War Spyware
This convenient and portable set of tools was designed so that CIA agents can hide it in the anus during the Cold War.The idea was that if you were taken prisoner, you could “pull out” a miniature set of tools and be saved. Although the idea makes most people laugh, it could possibly save a life.

4.

Spy shoes with a transmitter in the heel
Cold War Spyware
Similar to a gadget from old spy movies, these shoes, released by the KGB, are a reminder of what happened during the Cold War, and proof of the huge amount of technical innovation that emerged during the era of espionage. Agents used a transmitter in their shoes to record and monitor super-secret conversations. Batteries and a microphone were installed in the heel of the shoes, which made them a walking radio station for nearby listeners.

5.

Pistol in lipstick
Cold War Spyware
This 4.5-mm pistol, placed in a tube of lipstick, often called the "Kiss of Death." KGB agents used it during the Cold War. The existence of weapons was discovered when crossing the border in West Berlin. Twisting the base of the lipstick produced a single bullet.

6.

Glasses for suicide
Cold War Spyware
These glasses contained a cyanide bead hidden inside. The spy could carelessly eat glasses and release poison.It was a way to avoid prison or terrible torture if captured by the enemy.

7.

Cyanide Double Gun
Cold War Spyware
This weapon is charged with a double dose of potassium cyanide, which can instantly kill a person. It was first used by a KGB officer Bogdan Stashinsky when he killed two Ukrainian dissidents living in Germany. He managed to hide the weapon in a folded newspaper; no one could suspect anything.

8.

Spy Bolt-Cache
Cold War Spyware
The spy bolt-stash was hollow inside so that men and women could safely transmit secret messages to each other. If someone searched the pockets of these people, then no one would suspect anything dangerous about the bolt.

9.

Lock picks
Cold War Spyware
These master keys were usually used for more complex locks. The devices, as it turned out, were really convenient for those who broke into the dwelling of the enemy.

10.

Pocket Camera F-21
Cold War Spyware
The KGB released this small spy cam during the Cold War. Her lens was hidden in the buttonhole, and the wire went down to the hole of the pocket, where the user could press the shutter button to take a picture. These types of cameras were used at public events, such as political conventions.

11.

Duplicate key set
Cold War Spyware
Like the master decoders, this small kit was very useful during the war. All this was in a small, convenient jar with a piece of clay, which was used to copy any key that soldiers or spies might need.

12.

Hollow coin
Cold War Spyware
No one will consider money suspicious and dangerous. Spies usually used hollow coins to pass tapes to each other. As was the case with many of these devices, if the spy were caught, no one would suspect that he could transmit information using a coin.

13.

Covert camera
Cold War Spyware
At first glance, no one could determine that a special camera with a lens in a button is hidden in a coat. The man wearing the coat had a small button on the inside of his pocket, allowing him to click every time he needed to take a photo.

14.

Cufflinks
Cold War Spyware
These cufflinks, designed in the mid-1950s, had small cavities to hide microfilms. Anyone who wore a suit was required to have cufflinks, so it was an easy way to hide the tape.

15.

Parachute / civil shoes
Cold War Spyware
The work of a spy implies the need to perform some crazy tricks. When some spies had to jump with a parachute, they should have special shoes. However, after landing, they had to mingle with the crowd so as not to attract attention. This led to the idea of ​​a shoe with a zipper, which was modernized from parachute to ordinary civilian shoes. All that the spy had to do after landing was to unfasten a piece of zipper shoes and throw away the excess.

16.

Umbrella with a poison dart
Cold War Spyware
This type of umbrella was actually used to kill the Bulgarian writer George Markov in London in 1978. Markov was waiting for the bus to go to work, when he felt a shot in the leg. He saw a man with an umbrella standing behind him. George died three days later in the hospital from ricin poisoning. An autopsy found a small hole in his leg.

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  • Cold War Spyware

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