Popular misconceptions about fitness

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Popular misconceptions about fitness

When you want to tone your muscles, lose weight or improve your mood, you decide to go in for fitness. Unfortunately, there is a lot of information that does not help you achieve your goal - or even harm. For example, which is better for weight loss - exercise or diet? Is it true that a marathon is good for health? The answers to these questions may surprise you.

1.

To lose weight quickly, the most important thing is to train.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
This is not true. Research results suggest that in the short term, diet has much more significance than increasing the intensity of sports. In the long run, however, regular exercise is more important in order to stay in shape.

2.

Strength training will turn fat into muscle.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
Nope Weight lifting will not magically make your flabby muscles strong. Unfortunately, fat does not turn into muscles. But lifting weights will help you build muscle.

3.

The only time to practice is early morning.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
According to several studies, day and evening are just as good for practicing as early morning.
However, some studies suggest that early workouts help speed weight loss.
In addition, daylight plays an important role in weight loss. By synchronizing our internal clock, or daily biorhythms, with natural ones, we help speed up our metabolism. According to a recent study, people who enjoyed the sun for the first two hours after awakening were thinner than those who did not receive any natural light whatever they ate during the day.

4.

Women should not lift weights, otherwise they will form a male figure.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
You know what? Lifting weights is perfectly safe - and very helpful for muscle strength. The ability to build up large muscles directly depends on the level of testosterone, and in women it is lower on average. So if you are a woman, the chances that you are pumping up are incredibly small.

5.

A few minutes on the treadmill will start the fat burning process.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
To lose a pound, you need to burn 3500 calories - much more than the amount of calories that an average adult (man or woman) eats for a whole day.For comparison: the average American man will burn about 330 calories in twenty minutes of running at a moderate pace.

6.

Keeping a food diary is a reliable way to control what you eat.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
Not certainly in that way.
Even if we try to be more conscious about what we put in our mouths and how active we live, we tend to trust ourselves more than we should.
"People tend to overestimate their physical activity and underestimate how much food they consume," said Philip Stanforth, a scientist at the University of Texas and director of the Texas Fitness Institute. “Everyone constantly thinks that they did more work and ate less.”

7.

To lose weight, you need to reduce the consumption of carbohydrates and sugar.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
The problem of fashionable diets is very simple: they are temporary. To lose weight and keep fit, you need to find a diet that you can stick to all your life.
“We say that we went on a diet, which suggests that we are tears from it. That's the whole point, ”says Philip Stanforth.

8.

Running a marathon is the best way to become slim and fit.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
Good news: you can stop being ashamed that you have not signed up to run a marathon, which everyone says so.In fact, you can get all the advantages of long-distance running without even breaking the 8-kilometer line.
Running five to ten minutes a day can bring the same health benefits as running for hours. In fact, people who run less than an hour a week (if they run every day) receive the same heart benefits as those who run more than three hours a week.
Recent studies suggest that short intensive exercises can bring the same health benefits as long and exhausting exercises - and they are also more fun!

9.

Doing once or twice a week is enough to stay in shape.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
If you are already in decent shape, exercise a couple of times a week will not be of particular use.
“It’s best to study at least three times a week,” said Sean Arent, a scientist at Rutgers University. “In fact, you should do something every day, and by the word“ something ”I mean physical activity - just move.”

10.

Isotonic drink Gatorade - the best drink after exercise.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
Sorry lovers of Gatorade: this energy drink consists mainly of sugar and water.
After a workout, experts recommend taking about 20 grams of protein (of any origin) and drinking plenty of water.

11.

If you stop practicing, it will take at least two weeks to lose your form.
Popular misconceptions about fitness
Unfortunately, all these strong muscles, on which you worked so much in the summer, will most likely begin to disappear within a few days after you stop training.
In most cases, the muscles begin to disappear within a week without regular exercise.

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  • Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness

    Popular misconceptions about fitness